History of the Framework:

CO ASCD conducted Gallery Gatherings to solicit insights and ideas about what is needed to enhance instruction in ways that better engage students, deepen their content knowledge, and improve their ability to solve real-world problems. These ideas were grouped into seven categories: play, inquiry, personalized learning, experiential learning, competency-based learning, design thinking, and connected communities, which form the categories for the framework.


Purpose of the Framework:

Framework 2021 is designed to assist teachers in engaging students in real world applications of the state's benchmarks for knowledge and skills, including applications that accommodate culturally diverse contexts. Framework 2021 provides teachers with a coordinated matrix of instructional approaches which create learning experiences that prepare students for the world in which they will work and contribute in the future. The framework is designed to strengthen the vertical alignment of teaching and learning skills from preschool to higher education, providing a coherent and cohesive set of learning experiences and fostering positive attitudes toward teaching and learning across the education system.


Philosophy of the Framework:

Framework 2021 is predicated on the idea that learning takes place in and out of the classroom. The framework encourages student learning that is social, collaborative, and supported, in order to move students towards ownership of their education over the course of Pre-K to university. The framework is aligned with Whole Child tenets, providing teachers with techniques to aid students' health, safety, engagement, support, and challenge.



Framework 2021 Matrix

           


 


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In order to encourage student ownership over time, we have levels of scaffolding built into the framework. The levels are designed to move from high levels of teacher efforts and involvement to high levels of student effort and involvement over time:

Level 1: Demonstrated / Modeled

  • Teacher view: teacher demonstrates a skill set, talking through why the skill set matters and talking through the thinking process, modeling skill from start to finish

  • Student impact: Student hears and sees the process involved behind a skill set; know expectations for a task

    Level 2: Shared

    • Teacher view: teachers starts by framing the goal / process / skill / task and then works with students to complete; teacher ask smaller step questions, teacher walks through and stops to check with the student at points (fills a double purpose - formative assessment and increases student engagement); feedback from teacher to fill in any gaps in understanding, whether conceptual or procedural

    • Student impact: Student gains some engagement with the skill set; student applies their own thinking and is able to receive appropriate feedback from the teacher

      Level 3: Facilitated

      • Teacher view: teacher provides focus to start a task and to review it; offers students an example to work from to apply this new skill set; teacher asks the big question and then provides students with time for guided practice, letting them ask questions of teacher when struggles occur; metacognitive (what skills are you going to use?)***; feedback from teacher; opportunity for revision

      • Student impact: Students practice skill set, while utilizing available resources in the classroom, including the teacher and other students. Students have more responsibility for their learning and have the opportunity to play with ideas and concepts.

        Level 4: Student Driven

        • Teacher view: Teacher releases control to students, minimally managing time and resources. Teacher teaches or reteaches occasionally to supplement student process.

        Student impact: Students continues to practice a skill set, getting closer and closer to mastery. Students has responsibility for their choice of resources, procedures, and tasks; students self-assess more and advocate for themselves when they struggle

        • Student impact: Students continues to practice a skill set, getting closer and closer to mastery. Students has responsibility for their choice of resources, procedures, and tasks; students self-assess more and advocate for themselves when they struggle



        Framework Matrix Elements and Fundamentals , Defined:


                 


        Elements: Who, Where, When, Why, and How? 

        In this section, you will find basic definitions for each elemental approach.

        Planning: How do you plan for it?

        In this section, you will find guidance for lesson design within each instructional approach.

        How do you plan for a particular Instructional Approach?

        Purpose:  The planning section for each approach offers guiding questions, templates, and best practice tips for guidance in lesson design.

        Intended Outcomes:

        • Teacher View: Understanding of the basics of the approach
        • Student Impact: Understanding of the approach itself or benefit from teacher's understanding which levels the playing field amongst all learners

        General Planning Questions:

        Useful for all approaches

        1. What are the prior knowledge and experiences for this group of learners?
        2. What demographic characteristics might be important to consider for this group of learners?
        3. What standard(s) is addressed by the lesson?
        4. What is the cognitive level are students expected to achieve?
        5. How will learning be monitored?
        6. How will the lesson be differentiated?
        7. What interventions and extensions will be available for students?

        8. What is the level of student ownership in the lesson?
        9. What content should students know by the end of the lesson?
        10. What skills should students engage with by the end of the lesson?
        11. How can I assess student outcomes?
        12. What learning experiences will aid students in achieving content or skill knowledge?
        13. How will the learning environment be arranged/accessed to support the learning? (face to face and/or online?)
        14. How will students self-assess their learning?
        15. How will the student collaboration process shape our learning?
        16. How can I be a resource for students? What other resources will I need to execute this lesson?


          Application: What does it look like?

          In this section, you will find models, strategies, and examples for each instructional approach

          What does it look like?

          Purpose:  The application section for each approach offers models, strategies, and examples for teachers as a resource.


          Intended Outcomes:

          • Teacher View: Gradual release of support from teacher modeling to student ownership
          • Student Impact: Achieve learning goals


          – Back to the Matrix –


          Reflection: How did it go?

          In this section, you will find guided questions and techniques for reflecting on each instructional approach.

          How did it go?

          Purpose:  The reflection section for each approach offers guidance for teachers to meta-cognitively reflect on the lesson once it has occurred.

          Intended Outcomes:

          • Teacher View: Better understanding of the teaching and learning process leading to professional growth
          • Student Impact: Practice meta-cognitive and self assessment

          General Reflection Questions:

          1. To what extent did students meet the intended outcome or goal for the lesson?

          2. To what extent were the students engaged? How did you know?

          3. What worked well, overall?

          4. What could be changed for next time, to improve the outcomes of the lesson?

          5. Was the topic clear? Was the topic appropriate to the developmental stage of the students?

          6. Was the lesson sufficiently differentiated? What could I do next time, to differentiate instruction even more?

          7. Did students require additional context or background knowledge in order to meet the lesson outcome?

          8. Did the materials involved help further students’ understanding? What (if any) additional resources or materials would help students, next time?

          9. Did the physical layout of the space help or hinder the lesson?

          10. What comes next? Does what I have planned next build off of the lesson in some way?


          – Back to the Matrix –



          Transformation: How can I act on my reflections?

          In this section, you will find means for enacting changes to the teaching and learning process.

          How can I act on reflection?

          Purpose:  The transformation section for each approach offers a more open ended teacher driven approach to act upon reflections for professional growth.

          Intended Outcomes:

          • Teacher View:
            • aid in professional growth
            • how to better assist student learning
            • refining practice over time
            • increased sharing with others
          • Student Impact:
            • application to new situations and other areas
            • overall growth as a learner


          – Back to the Matrix –


          Actualization: 

          Currently in development

          In this section, you will find...

          How can I actualize?

          Purpose:  

          Intended Outcomes:

          • Teacher View:
          • Student Impact:


                       


          Fundamentals: What is it?

          In this section, you will find basic definitions for each instructional approach.

          What is the Instructional Approach?

          Purpose:  The fundamental section for each approach offers a basic definition and surface level understanding.

          Intended Outcomes:

          • Teacher View: Understanding of the basics of the approach
          • Student Impact: Understanding of the approach itself or benefit from teacher's understanding which levels the playing field amongst all learners
          Note:  at this point we're only addressing "inquiry-based learning" other fundamental elements are currently in development.  If you are interested in joining our team of educators developing this exciting project please email: coascd.president@gmail.com 





          Inquiry-Based Learning

          At base, inquiry-based learning is seeking understanding through questioning. Students utilize intrinsic curiosity to construct questions around topics and seek thorough answers to those questions. Teachers that encourage inquiry-based approaches can in turn help students to thrive personally and professionally, even beyond the classroom.

          Please see the following resources for a more comprehensive view into inquiry-based learning:

          Scaffolding Levels of Inquiry:

          Structured Inquiry

          • Teacher Driven

          • Procedural

          • Emergent

          “In structured inquiry, the students investigate a teacher-presented question through a prescribed procedure, and receive explicit step-by-step guidelines at each stage, leading to a predetermined outcome, similar to following a recipe” (Zion & Mendelovici, 2021, p. 384).

          Guided Inquiry

          • Teacher Guided (“We do”)

          • Students formulate  

          • Collaborative

          “In guided inquiry, students investigate questions and procedures that teachers present to them, but the students themselves, working collaboratively, decide the processes to be followed and the solutions to be targeted. The results are not foreknown to the teachers and students. In guided inquiry, the teacher provides the student with inquiry questions and procedures, and therefore this decreases the level of uncertainty during the inquiry process. The students ultimately lead the inquiry process, are involved in decision making from the data collection stage, and may come up with unforeseen yet well-conceived conclusions (Zion & Mendelovici, 2021, p. 384).

          Student-Driven Inquiry

          • Teacher facilitated

          • Student-driven

          Open (also student-driven, research-based, independent)

          “In open inquiry, the most complex level of inquiry-based learning, teachers define the knowledge framework in which the inquiry will be conducted, but allows the students to select a wide variety of inquiry questions and approaches (student-designed or selected). Thus, students are engaged in continuous decision-making throughout each stage of the open inquiry process, starting from the stage of finding the interesting phenomenon to be inquired” (Zion & Mendelovici, 2021, p. 384).

          Independent Inquiry

          • Students pick area of study and questioning (“You do”)

          • Outcomes and accountability




          Inquiry Based Learning –Planning


          Currently in development







          Inquiry Based Learning –Application

          This section includes information about models for inquiry-based learning, sample lessons, videos that illustrate what inquiry-based learning looks like in the classroom, and strategies for addressing various components of inquiry-based learning, such as questioning and engaging students in discussions.  Several of the resources (e.g., Edutopia, Teaching Channel) are good starting points because they have many links on their sites that allow an in-depth exploration of the topic.


          Resources




          Inquiry Based Learning –Reflection

          Inquiry-Based Learning Questions:
          • Were the questions that I gave or that students generated clear? Were they authentic? Were they appropriate to students’ cognitive levels?
          • Were the students developing a variety of questions? Did their questions lead to deeper understanding of the topic?
          • How well were students able to create and/or follow the inquiry process?
          • How able were students to seek aid in understanding the topic? In developing questions?
          • How able were students to gain information from one another? From additional resources? (Teacher, school materials)
          • Were students able to make connections to their own lives, education, and the world around them?
          • To what extent were students able to support their conclusions?
          • On a scale of 1-10, how able were the students to reach the desired structured inquiry outcome,  if not a 10, what can we do better?



          Inquiry Based Learning –Transformation


          Questions to guide transformation:

              1. What did I learn?
              2. How can I implement changes for next time?

          or...

          1. What do I want to transform? (Planning, Application, Reflection)

              •     consider classroom setting (add examples of classroom settings)
              • supporting differentiated learning

          2. What steps do I need to take to transform?

          3. What resources do I need make this transformation?

          4. What support would I need?

          5. What do I hope to accomplish with the transformation?


          or...

          1. What did I already know?

          2. What new understandings do I have based on reflections?

          3. How will my practice change?

          4. How will I share what I have learned?


          Things to remember:

              • Peer growth partner
              • importance of getting connected with someone- expertise
              • writing down goals in order to act on goals
              • want people to create and share own templates with others

          Inquiry Based Learning –Actualization

          Currently in development







          Play Based Learning

          Currently in development

          – Back to the Matrix –



          Connected Communities

          Currently in development




          Personalized Learning

          Currently in development

          – Back to the Matrix –



          Experiential Learning

          Currently in development

          – Back to the Matrix –



          Competency-Based Learning

          Currently in development



          Design Thinking

          Currently in development


          – Back to the Matrix –



          Note:  at this point we're only addressing "inquiry-based learning" other fundamental elements are currently in development.  If you are interested in joining our team of educators developing this exciting project please email: coascd.president@gmail.com 


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